Evaluating UK Frameworks for Results
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August 2013

Results-based approaches to international development are increasingly seen as a way of improving the value for money of aid and as a means of promoting accountability to those who fund these interventions. Frameworks for Results are one example of a results-based approach.

In December 2010, DFID published the UK Frameworks for Results for Malaria and Reproductive, Maternal and Newborn Health (RMNH). These frameworks set out how DFID will deliver on its commitments to help halve deaths from malaria in at least ten high burden countries by 2015, and to save the lives of at least 50,000 women during pregnancy and childbirth and 250,000 newborn babies by 2015. Each of the frameworks was supplemented in 2011 by a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework that further articulates DFID’s strategy and aims in each of these areas.

e-Pact, a consortium led by OPM, has been selected to lead an independent evaluation to assess the results achieved under these frameworks and their effectiveness as a modality. The other consortium members include ITAD and a large number of senior academics from several universities.

As part of the evaluation, the team has completed an evaluability assessment that provides an overview of the evaluation purpose, identifies the key evaluation questions, sets out the approach and methodology, and presents an initial assessment of the data sources that will be used in the evaluation.

In 2013 OPM will carry out a Mid-Term Review of the frameworks that will take stock of progress in implementation and set out recommendations for changes that need to be made in order to achieve DFID’s results and monitor progress. A final evaluation will be carried out in 2016 to assess more comprehensively the results achieved through the frameworks.

Given the relatively new nature of results-based approaches among donors, there have been few opportunities to evaluate both the results themselves and the effectiveness of such approaches in mobilising resources to achieve these results. This project therefore represents a chance to support DFID in its efforts to deliver value-for money and accountability in delivering programmes.

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Evaluating UK Frameworks for Results

August 2013

Results-based approaches to international development are increasingly seen as a way of improving the value for money of aid and as a means of promoting accountability to those who fund these interventions. Frameworks for Results are one example of a results-based approach.

In December 2010, DFID published the UK Frameworks for Results for Malaria and Reproductive, Maternal and Newborn Health (RMNH). These frameworks set out how DFID will deliver on its commitments to help halve deaths from malaria in at least ten high burden countries by 2015, and to save the lives of at least 50,000 women during pregnancy and childbirth and 250,000 newborn babies by 2015. Each of the frameworks was supplemented in 2011 by a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework that further articulates DFID’s strategy and aims in each of these areas.

e-Pact, a consortium led by OPM, has been selected to lead an independent evaluation to assess the results achieved under these frameworks and their effectiveness as a modality. The other consortium members include ITAD and a large number of senior academics from several universities.

As part of the evaluation, the team has completed an evaluability assessment that provides an overview of the evaluation purpose, identifies the key evaluation questions, sets out the approach and methodology, and presents an initial assessment of the data sources that will be used in the evaluation.

In 2013 OPM will carry out a Mid-Term Review of the frameworks that will take stock of progress in implementation and set out recommendations for changes that need to be made in order to achieve DFID’s results and monitor progress. A final evaluation will be carried out in 2016 to assess more comprehensively the results achieved through the frameworks.

Given the relatively new nature of results-based approaches among donors, there have been few opportunities to evaluate both the results themselves and the effectiveness of such approaches in mobilising resources to achieve these results. This project therefore represents a chance to support DFID in its efforts to deliver value-for money and accountability in delivering programmes.