Better access to water
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June 2013

Tanzania’s Water Sector Development Programme (WSDP) is one of the largest of its kind in Africa but it is still has to overcome a number of problems if this $1.3 billion programme is to realise its 20-year vision, according to a recent evaluation.

Funded under a sector-wide approach to planning (SWAp), WSDP encompasses not only rural and urban water supply and sanitation but also water resources management and measures to develop sector capacity.

The evaluation found that there were teething problems in the early years of the WSDP but these have now mainly been resolved. However, there are still large unspent balances in the Rural Water Supply and Sanitation component each year, mainly due to difficulties in adapting to new funding arrangements. In addition, an analysis of initial Water Point Mapping data suggests that around 40% of water points in the country are not working. More generally, WSDP has still not significantly changed outcomes for people in terms of increased access to water and sanitation, with progress only keeping step with population growth. However, further gains are expected in the next few years now that the groundwork has been laid.

The evaluation makes several recommendations to accelerate progress. These range from clearly defining the scope, objectives and leadership of the programme through to adopting a more participatory, multi-stakeholder approach and stopping grant-funded investments in sewerage.

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Better access to water

June 2013

Tanzania’s Water Sector Development Programme (WSDP) is one of the largest of its kind in Africa but it is still has to overcome a number of problems if this $1.3 billion programme is to realise its 20-year vision, according to a recent evaluation.

Funded under a sector-wide approach to planning (SWAp), WSDP encompasses not only rural and urban water supply and sanitation but also water resources management and measures to develop sector capacity.

The evaluation found that there were teething problems in the early years of the WSDP but these have now mainly been resolved. However, there are still large unspent balances in the Rural Water Supply and Sanitation component each year, mainly due to difficulties in adapting to new funding arrangements. In addition, an analysis of initial Water Point Mapping data suggests that around 40% of water points in the country are not working. More generally, WSDP has still not significantly changed outcomes for people in terms of increased access to water and sanitation, with progress only keeping step with population growth. However, further gains are expected in the next few years now that the groundwork has been laid.

The evaluation makes several recommendations to accelerate progress. These range from clearly defining the scope, objectives and leadership of the programme through to adopting a more participatory, multi-stakeholder approach and stopping grant-funded investments in sewerage.